Second Sight

SecondSight

I was recommended this book when I was utterly anxious and confused about my sensitivities. Torn between two perspectives-one that opened up pure light and energy for me and another that labeled me as a crazy person needing to be medicated, this book confirmed what I knew all along. Science has come far from the “world is flat” era, but it still cannot explain the complexities that extend the human eye and mind. After reading this book, I began to realize that it is possible to merge the two worlds and have both ideologies exist. Judith Orloff is a licensed psychiatrist who is also an intuitive. She described an intuitive as those with some sort of psychic or psychic mediumship abilities. I think those “titles” should be reserved for men and women in practice because there are many others who have the same empathic qualities and work in fields of Science and Arts. These people are sponges to energy and can read and feel energy other than their own. For those people who are interested in her life experience of combining medicine with intuition would love this book.

The book started similarly to many a life stories. She was a happy girl, but then soon succumbed to depression when she started feeling things that she couldn’t explain. She turned to drugs and had a near death experience before she realized that there is more to this than the eye can see. The book carefully explores her life from being a troubled young adult to a successful psychiatrist with her own practice in Southern California.

I was surprised to learn that people in the medical field were curious about these extra sensory abilities since the 1970’s. She talks about her time in UCLA when she was a research subject for paranormal abilities (yes, she talks about people bending spoons as well). She felt she belonged there, but wanted to do more to help people understand who she is on a larger scale. So she chose the field of medicine, which can make situations complicated for people who don’t understand or believe in the spiritual world. Later, she discovered through guided practice that she could apply her intuitive abilities to read her patients and help them on a deeper level. It was fascinating to learn that she could smell alcohol from talking to an alcoholic over the phone. She meditated on what her patients needed and what was the best course of action in psychotherapy in addition to medication. It is this deep, empathetic understanding that makes anyone a great doctor.

She teaches her readers that although her medicine degree gives her more credibility, it is her intuitive abilities that make her different (read “better”) than any other psychiatrist in the field. This remarkable portrait of her journey from battling her own disbelief in her abilities to her acceptance of intuition as a therapeutic tool will open your eyes to how anyone can use their intuition to improve their lives and lives of others. Don’t worry, there are plenty of real life examples for those doubters out there so don’t think this book is a work of fiction. Open your mind and expand your knowledge and perception that there is much more in the universe than the mind allows you to see. Happy Reading!

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